2018 Summer Game #3: Tens and Ones Bingo

Bingo! All the math bingo games have been winners with my kids but Tens and Ones Bingo, game N40 in the Math Card Games book, is particularly suited for those learning how to form numbers up to 99.

Three children played this game today. We only have one set of Place Value Cards, so I made two more sets using index cards. Each player needs the “ones” (numbers 1 to 9) and “tens” (10, 20, 30… 90). The caller needs a deck of the 9’s multiplication cards: 9, 18, 27, 36, etc.

Each player chooses 16 of the 18 available Place Value cards and forms a 4 by 4 array with the cards face up. The cards do not need to be in any particular order. Here’s Peter’s bingo board.

The caller (that’s me in this game) shuffles the 9’s cards and places them face down in a stack. When everyone is ready, the caller turns over the top card and calls out the number.

The first card was 81. I say “8-ten 1” and the children turn over the 8-ten card (80) and the 1 card. Sometimes one of the cards won’t be on the bingo card because two cards were left out of the game! Happily, Peter had both the 8-ten and 1 card.

We keep playing. Now look at Peter’s bingo card. He’s close to having a full column turned over. Just one number missing in the second column and hoping for a 3….

BINGO! 63 was called and Peter won two ways – both a column and a row with one perfectly timed card!

Like traditional bingo, the winner is the first to complete a row, column or diagonal. My kids enjoy the randomness and luck factor of this game. They also like to keep going to see who is the first to turn over all of the cards.

Enjoy this bingo game and other versions available in the Math Card Games book. And let us know how your family likes the games!

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Comments

  1. This is a great idea! I’ll definitely do this one with my kids!!

  2. Susan M Follansbee says:

    I LOVE the pictures along with the game explanation. It makes it much easier to understand.

  3. Thanks for these weekly ideas. I am looking forward to playing this one with my summer students who need help with multiples but also with their observation and thinking skills as your husband noted.
    Blessings to you and your family.
    Esther

  4. What a fun and educational game for kids. Can really see this being used in tons of classrooms!

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